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CALL for Commentaries and Photo Essays

25 May

Submission Deadline: June 30, 2018

About 
Student Anthropologist is the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the National Association of Student Anthropologists, the largest organization of student anthropologists in the world. It is an annual digital publication. We encourage students from all levels and disciplines to contribute to the journal.

Aim and Scope
We aim to provide students with an opportunity to present their research and voice their perspectives through our annual publication, Student Anthropologist. With each issue we explore new directions in anthropology, allowing student interests to guide our selection of thematic and theoretical avenues of inquiry. We seek a plurality of voices from all subfields and levels within the discipline. Student Anthropologist welcomes not only original research addressing anthropological issues and problems, but also submissions that examine how anthropological skills, ideas, and ethnography can shed light on contemporary social issues. The journal is committed to guiding students through the peer review and revision process to publish innovative and high-quality articles.

Submission Guidelines
We seek scholarly submissions from undergraduate and graduate students worldwide, in particular those emphasizing anthropology’s capacity to inform public issues, social problems, and global realities. These submissions should contain original research or commentary. In accordance with general academic publishing guidelines, articles/photos must not have been previously published elsewhere (in full or in part). However, non-published conference papers adapted to fit our journal’s guidelines may be acceptable. Please disclose if your paper has been or will be part of a conference presentation. We will work with you to see if we can accommodate you, depending on the circumstances.

Any student (in any country in the world) enrolled in a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral program may submit. While this is an anthropology journal, students do not need to be enrolled in an anthropology program.

We will also consider submissions from people who graduated in 2016 or 2017. Your submission should be at least partially based on research or other work you did while enrolled in a college or a university.

We are currently accepting:

  1. Commentaries: opinion, theory, or “think” pieces that are the author’s original work. Length should range from 500-2,000 words. One to five related photos or other graphics that you have the legal rights to (either you took the photo or created the graphic/artwork yourself or can provide written consent from the photographer to us) may be included. Please include any photos/graphics with your written submission.
  2. Photo essays: 10 to 20 compelling photos, ideally from the anthropological field, that tell a story in themselves. However, you can include up to 1,000 words of commentary. Again, you must have the legal rights to any and all images that will be published in Student Anthropologist.

All submissions should include:

  1. A cover sheet (the first page of the document) containing the author’s name, contact information, paper title, student status and affiliation, and any relevant acknowledgments.
  2. A double-spaced manuscript that adheres to The Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) and includes three keywords. Please save the document with your last name as the document name.
  3. Send your photos/graphics in an email or send a link such as Google Drive that only you and Student Anthropologist can access. (Again, we cannot publish previously published submissions — including photos and commentaries on personal blogs and/or social media.)

All submissions should be sent to the Interim Editor, Stephanie Mojica, at studentanthropologist@gmail.com.

Interested in Peer Reviewing?
In addition to publishing excellent student research, Student Anthropologist also aims to provide students of all levels with professional editorial opportunities. Students act as peer reviewers and editors.

If you would like to peer review or are interested in other journal production opportunities, please contact the Interim Editor, Stephanie Mojica, at studentanthropologist@gmail.com.

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CALL for Book Reviews – 2018

18 Apr

Deadline: Friday, June 1, 2018.

Student Anthropologist is the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the National Association of Student Anthropologists (the largest organization of anthropologist students in the world). It is an annual digital publication. Students from all levels and disciplines are encouraged to contribute. 

Aim and scope of journal
We aim to provide students with an opportunity to present their research and voice their perspectives through our annual publication, Student Anthropologist. We seek a plurality of voices from all subfields in each issue. Student Anthropologist welcomes submissions which explore how anthropological skills, ideas, and ethnography can have an impact on contemporary social issues. Student Anthropologist is also committed to guiding students through the peer review and revision process to craft excellent articles.

We are currently seeking submissions for our book review section. The journal accepts volunteered book reviews. Please contact the Book Review Editor (Elizabeth Holdsworth at eholdsworth@albany.edu) with book review suggestions. 

 Student Anthropologist is interested in three types of book reviews:

  1. Book reviews of current award-winning anthropology texts, including those of AAA section award winners;
  2. Book reviews of recently published ethnographies (within the past three years), edited volumes or other texts, which possess particularly useful pedagogical qualities;
  3. Reviews of two or three recently published books (within the past five years) focusing on a particular topic (i.e. well-being, kinship, etc.).

All potential authors are encouraged to contact the Book Review Editor before submitting a complete review to make sure that the books in which they are interested have not been reviewed and are appropriate for review

In each review, we request that you offer an overview of the text’s content and thesis. Beyond that, we expect you to provide a critical assessment of the text and to offer substantive and fair commentary on, for example, the quality of the theory, methodology, writing style, innovation, and connection to other published work. Please do refrain from a discussion of the author unless it is critical to the material. As a journal for and by students, Student Anthropologist is also particularly concerned with the pedagogical value of books. We encourage you to comment on the pedagogical qualities of the text. Why is reading this book important for anthropology students? What courses or level of students would benefit from reading it?

When writing your review, we also request that you consider the following guidelines:

  • Book review manuscripts must be 800-1,000 words long. (A multiple book review can be slightly longer, about 1,200-1,400 words.) Book reviews falling far short of or far exceeding this length will be returned to their authors without being examined. 
    • Manuscripts must be in 12-point font, double- spaced, with one-inch margin on all sides. Please save the manuscript as a Word document (.doc file), with your last name as the document name.
    • The submission should include the manuscript and a cover sheet containing the author’s name, contact information, student status and affiliation.
    • Please include publication data for the book at the top of the first page, using punctuation as follows: Title of the Book. Author’s Name. Place of publication: Publisher, date of publication. Number of pages. ISBN.
    • When reviewing an edited volume, do not feel that you must write about or mention every chapter. Instead describe the overall focus of the volume, pick a few significant contributions and discuss those in detail. Review previous publications for examples.
    • Be specific. Avoid vague affirmations or general statements. Instead of saying that the reviewed book is, for example, innovative, explain why it is so.
    • Reviews should not require footnotes. Avoid lengthy quotations and limit references to four-six. In-text references are cited in parentheses, with last name(s), year of publication, and where necessary, page numbers.
    • Manuscripts should follow the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

*The editors reserve the right to reject or return for revision any submitted material on the grounds of inappropriate subject matter, quality, length, or nonconformity with the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

All submissions and inquiries should be sent to the Book Review Editor at the contact information listed below.

Elizabeth Holdsworth
Student Anthropologist Book Review Editor
University at Albany, State University of New York
Anthropology Department
1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12222

E-mail: eholdsworth@albany.edu

Deadline: Friday, June 1, 2018.

 

 

 

POSITION FILLED – Call for Design Editor – 2018

14 Feb

Call for Design Editor
Submission Deadline: April 1, 2018

Student Anthropologist, the journal of the National Association of Student Anthropologists (a section of the American Anthropological Association) is currently seeking applications for a Design Editor for our 2018 issue (due out at the end of the year).

The Design Editor must be a current part-time or full-time undergraduate or graduate student in ANY discipline at any accredited college or university in the world. An interest in anthropology and/or academic publishing is strongly preferred.

The bulk of the Design Editor’s responsibilities will be in the fall, but we would like to get someone on board soon.

Student Anthropologist is published online in PDF format; we are not a print publication.

Required responsibilities and skills:

  • Create the cover for the 2018 annual issue, coordinating with the Interim Editor as appropriate.
  • Create any graphics needed to accompany articles in the issue, using a program such as Photoshop or Illustrator (Design Editor’s choice).
  • Improve the quality of any photos included in the issue, using a program such as Photoshop (Design Editor’s choice).
  • Resize and/or crop photos included in the 2018 issue, using a program such as Photoshop (Design Editor’s choice).
  • Design and layout the issue, using a program such as InDesign, Pages for Mac, Microsoft Publisher, or Microsoft Word (Design Editor’s choice).

Please send the following information to the Interim Editor, Stephanie Mojica, at studentanthropologist@gmail.com

  1. Name
  2. Current college or university
  3. Level (undergrad or graduate)
  4. Major
  5. Resume or CV
  6. If your graphic design/publication layout experience is not evident from your resume or CV, please give a paragraph or two about any relevant coursework and/or freelance work.
  7. Examples of graphics you have created
  8. Examples of documents/publications you have designed and/or done layout for. (optional, but candidates with such samples will be given priority consideration)

As is traditional with student publications, there is no pay. However, this is an invaluable opportunity to gain professional experience in academic publishing.

The deadline for applications is April 1, 2018.

POSITION FILLED: Call for Book Review Editor – 2018

12 Feb

Call for Book Review Editor
Submission Deadline: March 1, 2018

Student Anthropologist, the journal of the National Association of Student Anthropologists, is currently accepting applications for a Book Review Editor for our 2018 issue (due out at the end of the year). The Book Review Editor is primarily responsible for soliciting books and manuscripts, working with authors throughout the manuscript revision process, and providing general support to the editorial process.

Specifically, the Book Review Editor:

  • Identifies potential books for review and solicits desk copies from publishers
  • Solicits book review manuscripts by posting Calls for Book Reviews
  • Identifies promising students and invites them to submit manuscripts
  • Works with authors throughout the revision process and adheres to the journal’s policies and expectations for book reviews

If you are interested in submitting an application, please send the following to the Interim Editor of Student Anthropologist at studentanthropologist@gmail.com.

  1. Full name
  2. University Affiliation
  3. A current CV
  4. A brief response to: What book would you recommend for review and why?
  5. Optional, but highly recommended: A book review sample (from a journal or blog)

It is recommended that Book Review Editors are currently enrolled in an anthropology program at the graduate level, with a special preference for post-fieldwork Ph.D. students. However, any college student currently enrolled in an anthropology-related program may apply. *You do not need to be a U.S. citizen or attending a U.S. college to apply.*

Please read some Book Reviews from previous issues of Student Anthropologist and familiarize yourself with Reviewing Ethnographic Texts — A Rubric.

The deadline for applications is March 1, 2018.

Call for Papers and Peer Reviewers – 2018

5 Feb

Submission Deadline: March 16, 2018

About 
Student Anthropologist is the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the National Association of Student Anthropologists, the largest organization of student anthropologists in the world. It is an annual digital publication. We encourage students from all levels and disciplines to contribute to the journal.

Aim and Scope
We aim to provide students with an opportunity to present their research and voice their perspectives through our annual publication, Student Anthropologist. With each issue we explore new directions in anthropology, allowing student interests to guide our selection of thematic and theoretical avenues of inquiry. We seek a plurality of voices from all subfields and levels within the discipline. Student Anthropologist welcomes not only original research addressing anthropological issues and problems, but also submissions that examine how anthropological skills, ideas, and ethnography can shed light on contemporary social issues. The journal is committed to guiding students through the peer review and revision process to publish innovative and high-quality articles.

Submission Guidelines
We seek scholarly submissions from undergraduate and graduate students worldwide, in particular those emphasizing anthropology’s capacity to inform public issues, social problems, and global realities. These submissions should contain original research or commentary. In accordance with general academic publishing guidelines, articles must not have been previously published elsewhere (in full or in part). However, non-published conference papers adapted to fit our journal’s guidelines may be acceptable. Please disclose if your paper has been or will be part of a conference presentation. We will work with you to see if we can accommodate you, depending on the circumstances.

Any student (in any country in the world) enrolled in a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral program may submit. While this is an anthropology journal, students do not need to be enrolled in an anthropology program.

We will also consider submissions from people who graduated in 2016 or 2017. Your submission should be at least partially based on research or other work you did while enrolled in a college or a university.

We accept two types of scholarly submissions:

  1. Research Articles: based on the author’s original research; under 6,000 words in length.
  2. Commentary: opinion, theory, or “think” pieces that are the author’s original work. Submissions might include such mediums as written pieces (approximately 2,000 words in length), photo essays (10 photos and 1,000 words of commentary) and videos/YouTube© clips (10-minute maximum in duration and 1,000 words of commentary).

All submissions should include:

  1. A cover sheet (the first page of the document) containing the author’s name, contact information, paper title, student status and affiliation, and any relevant acknowledgments.
  2. A double-spaced manuscript that adheres to The Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) and does not contain any identifying information about the author (peer review is double-blind). This should also include a 250-word abstract and three keywords. Please save the document with your last name as the document name.

All submissions should be sent to the Interim Editor, Stephanie Mojica, at studentanthropologist@gmail.com.

Interested in Peer Reviewing?
In addition to publishing excellent student research, Student Anthropologist also aims to provide students of all levels with professional editorial opportunities. Students act as peer reviewers and editors.

If you would like to peer review or are interested in other journal production opportunities, please contact the Interim Editor, Stephanie Mojica, at studentanthropologist@gmail.com.

Announcing Student Anthropologist 2016

15 May

I am proud to present the 2016 issue of Student Anthropologist.

Student Anthropologist is the flagship journal of the student section of the American Anthropological Association, but it seems that we have historically been relegated to publishing our scholarship as PDFs to a WYSIWYG web host. You may note that there was some delay with the publication of this issue of Student Anthropologist. This is simply because just as I was preparing to publish the issue to our website, an exciting opportunity dropped into my lap: the opportunity to publish Student Anthropologist through my own institution – Washington University in St. Louis – on an open-access platform called bepress. I have long believed that because Student Anthropologist is a peer-reviewed publication, it needs an ISSN and that the articles therein need DOIs; bepress does just that, and will continue long after I finish my editorship and after I leave WUSTL. Further, bepress also acts as a portal from which we can distribute our Calls for Manuscripts and through which authors my submit their manuscripts*. Unfortunately, to move forward on this issue in a timely fashion, it is not possible to publish through bepress until the next issue. I am happy to report, however, that once our new bepress portal is online, we will begin retroactively archiving our backlog of issues and those articles will receive DOI numbers as well. Best of all, as I mentioned, bepress is open-access so the journal will continue to be available to anyone and everyone. I am very excited for the future of Student Anthropologist.

This issue would not have been possible without a lot of passionate and dedicated people. I want to thank my most immediate predecessor, Sara Smith, for her guidance and support throughout the process as I found my sea legs. I also want to thank my incredible Editorial Board who responded to countless, nagging emails with patience and understanding. More than anyone else, however, I need to highlight the hard work and drive of Alexea Howard (Peer Review Editor) and Jessica Chandras (Book Review Editor), without whom there would be no 2016 issue. The excellence that they demand of themselves is interminable and awe-inspiring, and it has been an honor to work with each of them.

*Manuscript and Book Review submissions are always welcome for the 2017 issue, but an official Call will be distributed shortly and we may ask that you resubmit through our new bepress portal.

Reviewing Ethnographic Texts: A Rubric

12 May

Book reviews are an art form, and the best reviewers make it look easy. As the Editor of Student Anthropologist, I want to provide some guidelines – or a rubric – that I think new reviewers will find helpful. First, here are the barebones requirements, per our Call for Book Reviews.

  • Book review manuscripts must be 800-1,000 words long. (A multiple-book review can be slightly longer, about 1,200-1,400 words.) Book reviews falling far short of or far exceeding this length will be returned to their authors without being examined.
  • Manuscripts must be in 12-point font, double- spaced, with one-inch margin on all sides. Please save the manuscript as a Word document (.doc file), with your last name as the document name.
  • The submission should include the manuscript and a cover sheet containing the author’s name, contact information, student status and affiliation.
  • Please include publication data for the book at the top of the first page, using punctuation as follows: Title of the Book. Author’s Name. Place of publication: Publisher, date of publication. Number of pages. ISBN.
  • When reviewing an edited volume, do not feel that you must write about or mention every chapter. Instead describe the overall focus of the volume, pick a few significant contributions and discuss those in detail. Review previous publications for examples.
  • Be specific. Avoid vague affirmations or general statements. Instead of saying that the reviewed book is, for example, innovative, explain why it is so.
  • Reviews should not require footnotes. Avoid lengthy quotations and limit references to 4-6. In-text references are cited in parentheses, with last name(s), year of publication, and where necessary, page numbers.
  • Manuscripts should follow the 2009 AAA Style Guide (http://www.aaanet.org/publications/guidelines.cfm).

But those are requirements, not guidelines. They will not help you write the review. If you’re struggling to write a review for a journal or a class, as I have so many times, I suggest that you take the following into consideration. These are the questions that I ask myself when I read an ethnographic text or a review of one.

Ethnographic texts are arguments, and as such they are both destructive and constructive. They intervene into a conversation already underway, and they bring something new to the table. They challenge our assumptions by examining the nuance of something that someone else – another author or the audience – may think of in sweeping generalizations. The author is making a case. This, I believe, is the key to writing a good, critical book review for Student Anthropologist.

If we take seriously the premise that ethnographic texts are arguments, then it follows that the author must provide evidence, and thus Pandora’s Box opens. The following questions emerge: What kind of evidence do they provide? Are the data and methodology appropriate, i.e. is it the right kind of evidence to support the author’s claims, and is there enough of it? What kind of ethnographic authority and sincerity is established that enables us, the audience, to buy these claims and the evidence?

There are stylistic questions as well. Is the text accessible? Does it flow from macro- to micro-perspectives or bounce around? Is the narrative temporally or thematically organized (or neither) and how does this strengthen or weaken the author’s illustration? Does the author clearly link evidence and claims back to the overarching argument? How does the author position themselves with respect to their research population, and how is the population represented, e.g. who speaks for them? Is the text more heavily weighted toward social theory (or philosophy) or ethnographic vignettes from which the theory might emerge organically? Does the author take a very positivist position or is the style very experimental or does it fall somewhere in the middle? How might the author’s style be influenced by their career trajectory? Is this text building on previous work or is it the result of dissertation research?

When writing the review, be clear and concise, be honest and frank, and please don’t gush. While there are a number of ways to structure a review, the best and easiest way is to just summarize the book and then analyze it using the questions above. Each chapter is making a smaller-argument; what is it, how is it supported, and what does it have to do with the previous chapter? Finish by telling us who the best audience is (e.g. undergraduates with an interest in astrobioanthropology?) and what is most useful about the book (e.g. the innovative methodology, the powerful ethnographic vignettes, the theoretical contribution).

Student Anthropologist is committed to the publication of excellent student-authored manuscripts, and as such we want our book reviews to be critically engaged with the texts in question. On the other hand, whether you’re writing a review for a journal or a course assignment, I think you’ll find this rubric useful.