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2020  –  Student Anthropologist – vol. 7 (1) 

This 2019/2020 edition of the Student Anthropologist has taken on new dimensions that mirror the changing circumstances of the world at large. In an expanded commentary section, students address some of the global ramifications of the COVID-19 Pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movements. With these new commentaries, the total number of pieces in the 2019/2020 edition reached twenty-one. The full set of original research articles, think pieces, photo commentaries, and book reviews offers a nuanced glimpse at the issues piquing the curiosity of young scholars today, in particular our discipline’s relationship to activism—from movements for racial equity (Symes; Nguyen; Haeberle) to calls for freedom of gendered and sexual expression (Carlos; Iafrate), work towards climate justice (Boughton; Rasiulis), and advocacy for alternative medical models (Ding, Katzman; Murray; Taaseen; Krapf). Many of our authors interweave these questions with theoretical and methodological concerns as they ruminate on how anthropologists might better serve communities in need while improving traditional structures of knowledge production (Rasiulis; Harkins, Lucas, Strickland; Hirst). These same themes appear in several students’ critical reflections and summaries of books written by advanced scholars (Frempong; Marr; Emma Kahn; Salovaara; Seiler; Hansen).

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2019  –  Student Anthropologist – vol. 6 (1) 

The student authors in this issue cover an impressive theoretical breath from strategies of neoliberal city-making to the political economy of tourism. They touch on topics as wide ranging as the ethics of fieldwork at home after a long absence and visions of anthropology’s path forward through embracing technological advancement while holding on to historical nuance. We hope that our readers will enjoy the glimpse these articles provide into the topics and issues that will continue to rise in the field over the next decades as young scholars, such as those showcased here, move forward in academia and beyond.

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2016  –  Student Anthropologist – vol. 5 (1)

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2013  –  Student Anthropologist – SPECIAL ISSUE, vol. 3 (4) – African Diaspora Religion

 In the study of African Diaspora, religion has played a key role because it was the most visible evidence of a social practice that demonstrated a connection to Africa. Religious and spiritual practice in everyday life figure prominently in how the diaspora is sustained, expanded and (re)created in different spaces all over the world. In the study of the African Diaspora, ideas of circulation, exchange, and (re)production are central. The articles in this volume discuss adaptation, immigration, globalization and transnationalism in connection with the African Diaspora. In all of these articles, we see how African diasporic religions are transmitted and introduced to new spaces and places; and how these adherents adapt to new environments and how these religious practices and spiritual pathways aid them in that process.

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2013  – cover Student Anthropologist – SPECIAL ISSUE, vol. 3 (3) – Anthropological Fieldwork

To truly remain a holistic field, we must constantly update our perspectives and our methodologies. We must continue to look far afield for new discoveries, techniques, and technologies that allow us to continue to consider “the science of humankind” in a new light. It is our wish that this special issue will inspire you to do just that. This collection of articles is not an end, but a beginning. While we hope that reading these articles will help you to expand your methodological toolkit, the issue will have fulfilled its purpose if it encourages you to consider new methodological combinations, or to look to other departments and fields in pursuit of ideas and methodologies that can further our shared commitment to understanding humankind.

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cover2013  –  Student Anthropologist, vol. 3 (2)

These articles represent a diversity of methods, regions, and sub-disciplines of anthropology. Two prominent themes have emerged from this collection: the enduring importance of methodological innovation in ethnographic and anthropological research and the relevance of these methods towards cultivating an understanding of politics, and in particular cultural politics. These articles are vastly different in their approaches, theories, and arguments. However, each engages with pressing social and political issues and as such represent the expansiveness of student ethnography and anthropology.

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2012  –  Student Anthropologist, vol. 3 (1)

“We are excited to release our third issue, my first issue as Editor of Student Anthropologist. This year the journal has seen many changes including assembling a new Editorial Board, the addition of a Book Review section, and general strengthening of journal processes. After a year of editorial work I have come to see the importance of close communication between authors, peer reviewers, and Editorial Board members as fundamental to encouraging productive publishing, of which revision is key. The writing process is a social effort and Student Anthropologist is committed fostering these conversations, which will improve research, writing, and representation practices among student scholars.”

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2011  –  Student Anthropologist, vol. 2 (2)

Who better to present research and commentaries on legacies than students? We are, after all, the legacies of the many anthropologists who have come before. More directly, we are the product of our own determination combined with the guidance of our mentors. Students who have had close working relationships with their mentors author the articles here, and the attention paid to the works shines through in their quality.

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2010  –  Student Anthropologist, vol. 2 (1)

The concept of circulation is one with which anthropologists are quite familiar. Our discipline has long dealt with the circulation of cultural traits, of kin groups, of individuals, of political will, of power…the list goes on and on. Outside of “the field”, here in our own home universities and departments however, the population of anthropologists perhaps most intimate with circulation consists of students. Students circulate through the halls of  academia, through universities as they progress toward their degrees, through classes and seminars, all the while taking in information and knowledge.”

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2009  –  Student Anthropologist, vol. 1   

NASA has had a long tradition of supporting student anthropologists. The creation of this e-journal marks a new foray for us as an association into the world of electronic publishing. We present in this double issue the first series of articles and commentaries that articulate the current state of students in the discipline today and the high caliber of work being undertaken across the globe by emergent anthropologists.”

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